Contact Me

To book a session contact me here:

Marina Stepanova, PGDip, MBACP

e-mail: sessions@resourcefulcounselling.com

phone: +447849601785

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Specialising in Anxiety, Depression, Addiction, Bereavement and Trauma

 
Anxiety

Anxiety is a normal, if unpleasant, part of life, and it can affect us all in different ways and at different times. Whereas stress is something that will come and go as the external factor causing it (be it a work, relationship or money problems, etc.) comes and goes, anxiety is something that can persist whether or not the cause is clear to the sufferer.

Some of the most common physical symptoms of anxiety are:

  • Increased heart rate

  • Increased muscle tension

  • “Jelly legs”

  • Tingling in the hands and feet

  • Hyperventilation (over breathing)

  • Dizziness

  • Difficulty in breathing

  • Wanting to use the toilet more often

  • Feeling sick

  • Tight band across the chest area

  • Tension headaches

  • Hot flushes

  • Increased perspiration

  • Dry mouth

  • Shaking

  • Choking sensations

  • Palpitations

Some of the most common psychological symptoms (the thoughts or altered perceptions we have) of anxiety are:

  • Thinking that you may lose control and/or go “mad”

  • Thinking that you might die

  • Thinking that you may have a heart attack/be sick/faint/have a brain tumour

  • Feeling that people are looking at you and observing your anxiety

  • Feeling as though things are speeding up/slowing down

  • Feeling detached from your environment and the people in it

  • Feeling like wanting to run away/escape from the situation

  • Feeling on edge and alert to everything around you

 
Depression

Everyone has ups and downs. Sometimes you might feel a bit low, for lots of different reasons. People may say that they are feeling depressed when they are feeling down, but this does not always mean that they have depression.

Depression is a long lasting low mood disorder. It affects your ability to do everyday things, feel pleasure or take interest in activities.

     Depression is:

  • a mental illness that is recognised around the world,

  • common ,

  • something that anyone can get, and

  • treatable

  • Depression is NOT: 

  • something you can 'snap out of’,

  • a sign of weakness,

  • something that everyone experiences, or

  • something that lasts forever as one episode.

You doctor would be able to make a diagnosis and prescribe medication. Counselling helps to get to its core and deal with it and enable you to manage your daily life in a better way. 

 
Bereavement

We grieve after any sort of loss, but most powerfully after the death of someone we love. It is not just one feeling, but a whole succession of feelings, which take a while to get through and which cannot be hurried.

We most often grieve for someone that we have known for some time. However, it is clear that people who have had stillbirths or miscarriages, or who have lost very young babies, grieve in the same way and need the same sort of care and consideration.

In the few hours or days following the death of a close relative or friend, most people feel simply stunned, as though they cannot believe it has actually happened. They may feel like this even if the death has been expected.

This sense of emotional numbness can be a help in getting through all the important practical arrangements that have to be made, such as getting in touch with relatives and organising the funeral.

However, this feeling of unreality may become a problem if it goes on too long. Seeing the body of the dead person may, for some, be an important way of beginning to overcome this.

Similarly, for many people, the funeral or memorial service is an occasion when the reality of what has happened really starts to sink in.

It may be distressing to see the body or attend the funeral, but these are ways of saying goodbye to those we love.

At the time, these things may seem too painful to go through and so are not done. However, this can lead to a sense of deep regret in future years.

 
Addiction

Addiction spreads to every kind of pleasurable behaviour: drinking, surfing (wave and internet), sex, food, and so on. Some activities or substances can generate a feeling that is so powerful that life without that feeling may never seem worthwhile again. For example, many gamblers have a big win early in their career and then spend the rest of their life chasing that buzz.

 
Trauma

When you experience a traumatic event, your body’s defences take effect and create a stress response, which may make you feel a variety of physical symptoms, behave differently and experience more intense emotions.

This fight or flight response, where your body produces chemicals which prepare your body for an emergency can lead to symptoms such as:

  • raised blood pressure

  • increased heart rate

  • increased sweating

  • reduced stomach activity (loss of appetite).

This is normal, as it’s your body’s evolutionary way of responding to an emergency, making it easier for you to fight or run away. 

Directly after the event people may also experience shock and denial. This can give way over several hours or days to a range of other feelings such as sadness, anger and guilt. Many people feel better and recover gradually.  

However, if these feelings persist, they can lead to more serious mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.

 
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